Physics

    • 9 Minutes Before Space

      9 Minutes Before Space is Russian television production on preparations made by first time cosmonaut at Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan!

      This documentary shows many aspects of the spaceflight, including some quite unique things like view of inside the Soyuz capsule during its reentry, how space technologies come back to Earth to resolve some problems here on the ground, the view from the top of the fueled Soyuz rocket ready to go, and some other interesting stuff.

      Running time 1 hour; 36 minutes.

    • Are There More Than Three Dimensions?

      For most of our history, we've rested easy in the notion that there were three dimensions that have existed throughout time: length, width and height. Ah, the good old days. In the early 20th century, Hermann Minkowski and Albert Einstein connected our comfortable three dimensions with a fourth, time, defining special relativity using a space-time continuum.

      This kind of worked, but still didn't explain a troublesome new theory of gravity called quantum mechanics that arose around the same time Minkowski and Einstein were working on their theories. Quantum mechanics had its own rules that contradicted the concepts behind the space-time continuum. Scientists treated this incompatibility like the weather for decades, discussing it but not really doing anything about it.

      Running time 43 minutes.

    • Big Black Hole

      Black holes are one of the most destructive forces in the universe, capable of tearing a planet apart and swallowing an entire star.

      Yet scientists now believe they could hold the key to answering the ultimate question - what was there before the Big Bang?

      The trouble is that researching them is next to impossible. Black holes are by definition invisible and there's no scientific theory able to explain them.

      Despite these obvious obstacles, Horizon meets the astronomers attempting to image a black hole for the very first time and the theoretical physicists getting ever closer to unlocking their mysteries.

      It's a story that takes us into the heart of a black hole and to the very edge of what we think we know about the universe.

      Running time 60 min.

    • Black Hole - Who's Afraid of a Big

      Black holes are one of the most destructive forces in the universe, capable of tearing a planet apart and swallowing an entire star.

      Yet scientists now believe they could hold the key to answering the ultimate question - what was there before the Big Bang?

      The trouble is that researching them is next to impossible. Black holes are by definition invisible and there's no scientific theory able to explain them.

      Despite these obvious obstacles, Horizon meets the astronomers attempting to image a black hole for the very first time and the theoretical physicists getting ever closer to unlocking their mysteries.

      Running time 60 minutes.

    • Einstein and E=mc^2

      Based on David Bodanis' bestseller, and shot on location, this is the story of history's most celebrated formula, E=mc^2, and the five great scientists who brought it to life.

      The docudrama, which first aired in 2005 and which boasts an all-star cast, spans 250 years, and tells the human story behind the science.

      The youthful romance of Einstein and his future wife Mileva is intertwined with some of the great scientific discoveries of the 19th century, which Einstein ultimately combined in his astonishing theory of relativity.

      Running time 100 min.

    • Einstein's Unfinished Symphony

      t was a journey that started 50 years earlier in Berne, Switzerland. Then – in his early 20s – he was a young man struggling to make his mark. His applications to universities throughout Europe had all been rejected. In the end his father had pulled strings to get him a job as a third class clerk evaluating the latest electrical gizmos. But in his spare time he was formulating the most extraordinary scientific ideas. In a single year – 1905, a year that would become known as his miracle year – he published papers that would redefine how we see our world and universe.

      He confirmed that all matter was composed of molecules – an idea that at the time was controversial. And most famously of all, he published the paper 'On the electrodynamics of moving bodies'. It contained his Theory of Special Relativity and suggested that time – something that had always thought to be unchanging and absolute – was relative. It could speed up or slow down depending on the speed you were travelling. From this paper would come an additional three pages, finished in September of the same year, that would contain the derivation of e=mc², the most famous mathematical equation ever written.

      Einstein was on a roll. Ten years after his Theory of Special Relativity, he published his Theory of General Relativity – a piece of work widely acknowledged as his masterpiece. The great 17th century scientist Sir Isaac Newton had described the force of gravity very successfully, but what caused gravity remained a mystery. In this Theory of General Relativity, Einstein suggested that gravity was due to the bending of time and space by massive objects. In 1919 astronomers confirmed this by measuring the bending of starlight around the sun during a solar eclipse.

      Running time 49 min.

    • Extraordinary Genius of Albert Einstein

      The core of the video is a pedagogical workshop on the Theory of Special Relativity as part of the educational process conducted by our youth leadership.

      Not for the sake of understanding the theory itself, but using Einstein's particular discovery as a case study to demonstrate and walk people through real human thinking, as being something above sense perceptions or opinions.

      We end with reflecting on the principle of relativity in terms of social relations and individual identities or thought processes, asking the question - how was Einstein able to make his breakthrough?

      Running time 1 hour; 43 min.

    • Fabric of the Cosmos

      The Fabric of the Cosmos, a four-hour series based on the book by renowned physicist and author Brian Greene, takes us to the frontiers of physics to see how scientists are piecing together the most complete picture yet of space, time, and the universe.

      With each step, audiences will discover that just beneath the surface of our everyday experience lies a world we'd hardly recognize - a startling world far stranger and more wondrous than anyone expected.

      Full documentary 3 hours, 25 minutes.

    • Faster than the Speed of Light?

      In September 2011, an international group of scientists has made an astonishing claim - they have detected particles that seemed to travel faster than the speed of light.

      It was a claim that contradicted more than a hundred years of scientific orthodoxy. Suddenly there was talk of all kinds of bizarre concepts, from time travel to parallel universes.

      Running time 58 minutes.

    • Frontiers of Deep Space

      Explore the revolution in our understanding of the nature of the universe and how it came to be.

      Scientists have further narrowed the search for a hypothetical particle that could be dark matter, the mysterious stuff that makes up 80 percent of all the mass in the universe. The video from NASA Astrophysics presents the new results, compiled from two years' worth of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

      Although no one is sure what dark matter is, one of the leading candidates is a yet-to-be-discovered particle called a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP). When two of these WIMPs meet, the theory goes, they can annihilate one another and generate gamma rays.

      From EsoCast, Dr. J. explores the upheaval in our understanding of the universe brought on by the discovery that the universe is not just expanding, but is accelerating outward at an ever increasing pace.

      Was Einstein wrong? Are we missing something crucial in our understanding of how it all began? Either way, this is one of the most exciting scientific discoveries in a long time.

      Full docuumentary 3 hours; 37 min.

    • Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

      Simply put, Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle states that it is impossible to know both the exact position and the exact velocity of an object at the same time. However, the effect is tiny and so is only noticeable on a subatomic scale.

      Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976) was a German physicist who helped to formulate quantum mechanics at the beginning of the 20th century. He first presented the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle in February 1927 in a letter to Wolfgang Pauli, then published it later that year.

      Light can be considered as being made up of packets of energy called photons. To measure the position and velocity of any particle, you would first shine a light on it, then detect the reflection. On a macroscopic scale, the effect of photons on an object is insignificant. Unfortunately, on subatomic scales, the photons that hit the subatomic particle will cause it to move significantly, so although the position has been measured accurately, the velocity of the particle will have been altered.

      By learning the position, you have rendered any information you previously had on the velocity useless. In other words, the observer affects the observed.

      Running time 29 min.

    • Higgs Boson - Who Killed America's Biggest Gadget?

      The hunt for the Higgs boson, god particle or goddamn particle, the one that gives things mass, came closer to an end.

      Physicists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in Europe, the world's largest particle accelerator, found evidence of the particle and its energy field. But the LHC didn't do it alone.

      The search has been a massive, costly and unprecedented international effort that began thousands of miles away, at another atom smasher beneath the Illinois prairie.

      Running time 21 min.

    • Higgs Boson - What is the ?

      Scientists behind Sixty Symbols (Ed Copeland, Roger Bowley and Tony Padilla from the University of Nottingham) are doing their best to answer what actually is the Higgs Boson.

      Named after Peter Higgs, an Edinburgh University physicist, the Higgs boson is crucial to understanding the origin of mass. The Higgs boson is a hypothetical elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. It belongs to a class of particles known as bosons, characterized by an integer value of their spin quantum number.

      Running time 50 minutes.

    • Light Darkness and Colors

      Using Goethe's Theory of Colors (Zur Farbenlehre) as point of departure, Light Darkness and Colors takes us on a fascinating journey through the universe of colors.

      In 1704, Sir Isaac Newton published Light and Refraction, his study of the interactions between sunlight and prisms.

      Newton was, as a good scientist, intent on achieving objectivity, which meant studying sunlight in isolation. He thought colors were contained solely in light, and found the spectrum he was looking for.

      Running time 51 minutes.

    • Light Fantastic

      God is light. In all cultures, there's an intimate association between illumination and divinity, between life and creation.

      Light is color. Light is energy. It fuels life and it feeds the spirit. It inspires art, religion, and science. Light holds the secrets of the universe. For thousands of years, humanity has tried to unlock the mysteries of light in its' search for the nature of God himself.

      Light Fantastic explores the phenomenon that surrounds and affects nearly every aspect of our lives but one which we take for granted - light.

      1. Let There Be Light. Greek and Arab scholars, and later Europeans such as Descartes and Newton all tried to understand light to gain a better understanding of God. Episode one shows how much of modern science's origins came from the desire to penetrate the divine nature of light.

      2. The Light of Reason. The second programme explores the link between the development of practical tools that manipulate light and the emergence of new ideas. For example, Galileo's observation that the sun did not go around the earth, was made with a telescope that had been invented for Venetian soldiers and traders.

      3. The Stuff of Light. Episode three charts the discovery of the true nature of light and its impact on the modern world. All of today's technologies - electricity, mobile communications and our ability to illuminate the world 24 hours a day - stem from unravelling the mystery of light.

      4. Light, The Universe and Everything. In the final programme Simon Schaffer finds that as more people were able to manipulate light, the more puzzling and tricky it became. This led to investigations into the strange relationship between light, the eye and the mind, and the development of new technology such as photography and cinema.

      4 segments total time 240 min.

    • Lost Lightning: The Missing Secrets of Nikola Tesla

      Alpha waves in the human brain are between 6 and 8 hertz. The wave frequency of the human cavity resonates between 6 and 8 hertz. All biological systems operate in the same frequency range. The human brain’s alpha waves function in this range and the electrical resonance of the earth is between 6 and 8 hertz. Thus, our entire biological system – the brain and the earth itself – work on the same frequencies. If we can control that resonate system electronically, we can directly control the entire mental system of humankind. Nikola Tesla was born on July 10, 1856 in Smiljan, Lika, which was then part of the Austo-Hungarian Empire, region of Croatia.

      His father, Milutin Tesla was a Serbian Orthodox Priest and his mother Djuka Mandic was an inventor in her own right of household appliances. Tesla studied at the Realschule, Karlstadt in 1873, the Polytechnic Institute in Graz, Austria and the University of Prague. At first, he intended to specialize in physics and mathematics, but soon he became fascinated with electricity. He began his career as an electrical engineer with a telephone company in Budapest in 1881.

      It was there, as Tesla was walking with a friend through the city park that the elusive solution to the rotating magnetic field flashed through his mind. With a stick, he drew a diagram in the sand explaining to his friend the principle of the induction motor. Before going to America, Tesla joined Continental Edison Company in Paris where he designed dynamos. While in Strassbourg in 1883, he privately built a prototype of the induction motor and ran it successfully. Unable to interest anyone in Europe in promoting this radical device, Tesla accepted an offer to work for Thomas Edison in New York. His childhood dream was to come to America to harness the power of Niagara Falls.

      Young Nikola Tesla came to the United States in 1884 with an introduction letter from Charles Batchelor to Thomas Edison: "I know two great men,” wrote Batchelor, "one is you and the other is this young man.” Tesla spent the next 59 years of his productive life living in New York. Tesla set about improving Edison’s line of dynamos while working in Edison’s lab in New Jersey. It was here that his divergence of opinion with Edison over direct current versus alternating current began. This disagreement climaxed in the war of the currents as Edison fought a losing battle to protect his investment in direct current equipment and facilities.

      Running time 46 min.

    • Magnetic Storm

      Like the plot of a sci-fi B movie, something weird is happening deep underground where the constant spin of Earth’s liquid metallic core generates an invisible magnetic force field that shields our planet from harmful radiation in space. Gradually, the field is growing weaker. Could we be heading for a demagnetized doomsday that will leave us defenseless against the lethal effects of solar wind and cosmic rays? “Magnetic Storm” looks into our potentially unsettling magnetic future.

      Scientists studying the problem are looking everywhere from Mars, which suffered a magnetic crisis four billion years ago and has been devoid of a magnetic field, an appreciable atmosphere, and possibly life ever since, to a laboratory at the University of Maryland, where a team headed by physicist Dan Lathrop has re-created the molten iron dynamo at Earth’s core by using 240 pounds of highly explosive molten sodium. The most visible signs of Earth’s magnetic field are auroras, which are caused by charged particles from space interacting with the atmosphere as they flow into the north and south magnetic poles.

      Running time 56 min.

    • Mars Underground

      This film captures the spirit of Mars pioneers who refuse to let their dreams be put on hold by a slumbering space program. Their passionate urge to walk the soil of an alien world is infectious and inspirational. This film is the manifesto of the new space revolution.

      Leading aerospace engineer and Mars Society President Dr. Robert Zubrin has a dream. He wants to get humans to the planet Mars in the next ten years.

      Now, with the advent of a revolutionary plan, Mars Direct, Dr. Zubrin shows how we can use present day technology and natural resources on Mars to make human settlement possible. But can he win over the skeptics at NASA and the wider world?

      The Mars Underground is a landmark documentary that follows Dr. Zubrin and his team as they try to bring this incredible dream to life. Through spellbinding animation, the film takes us on a daring first journey to the Red Planet and envisions a future Mars teeming with life and terraformed into a blue world.

      Running time 74 min.

    • Mars Underground

      This film captures the spirit of Mars pioneers who refuse to let their dreams be put on hold by a slumbering space program. Their passionate urge to walk the soil of an alien world is infectious and inspirational. This film is the manifesto of the new space revolution.

      Leading aerospace engineer and Mars Society President Dr. Robert Zubrin has a dream. He wants to get humans to the planet Mars in the next ten years.

      Now, with the advent of a revolutionary plan, Mars Direct, Dr. Zubrin shows how we can use present day technology and natural resources on Mars to make human settlement possible. But can he win over the skeptics at NASA and the wider world?

      Running time 114 minutes

    • Mission to Titan

      Short documentary about Titan, including panoramic images of the planet, the mission to send the probe there and why it holds the secret to life on Earth.

      Adam Hart-Davies introduces one of the most ambitious space exploration missions ever launched and professor John Zarnecki shows the first ever panoramic images of Titan.

       
      Running time 21 minutes
    • Moons of the Solar System

      How did the solar system form? Are we alone in the Universe? What are alien atmospheres made of? These questions can be answered by studying the solar system's vast family of satellites.

      This collection of videos looks at five of the most intriguing worlds that we've managed to visit over the last fifty years, including The Moon, Europa, Phobos, Deimos and Titan.

      Running time 31 minutes.

    • Neil deGrasse Tyson: Called by the Universe (Conversation)

      Neil deGrasse Tyson is the Frederick P. Rose Directorship of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City.His research interests include the structure of our Milky Way, star formation, exploding stars and dwarf galaxies.

      Running time 49 minutes.
    • Parallel Universes

      Everything you're about to read here seems impossible and insane, beyond science fiction. Yet it's all true.

      Scientists now believe there may really be a parallel universe - in fact, there may be an infinite number of parallel universes, and we just happen to live in one of them.

      These other universes contain space, time and strange forms of exotic matter. Some of them may even contain you, in a slightly different form.

      Astonishingly, scientists believe that these parallel universes exist less than one millimeter away from us. In fact, our gravity is just a weak signal leaking out of another universe into ours.

      9 min.

    • Reinventing Space Flight

      A small group of scientists has come to Fairbanks, Alaska to realize what may seem an impossible dream... to revolutionize space travel. They're there to test components of this rocket by sending them aboard helium balloons to an altitude of 30 kilometers into the harsh environment of space.
       
      Running time 50 minutes.
    • Richard Feynman: The Character of Physical Law

      Probably this is one of the oldest films posted at TDF. The Character of Physical Law are a series of seven lectures by physicist Richard Feynman concerning the nature of the laws of physics.

      The talks were delivered by Feynman in 1964 at Cornell University, as part of the Messenger Lectures series. Their text was published by the BBC in 1965 in a book by the same name.

      The lectures covered the following topics: The law of gravitation - an example of physical law, The relation of mathematics to physics, The great conservation principles, Symmetry in physical law, The distinction of past and future, Probability and uncertainty - the quantum mechanical view of nature, and Seeking new laws.

      Full documentary 6 Hours.


  • Science and Islam

    Physicist Jim Al-Khalili travels through Syria, Iran, Tunisia and Spain to tell the story of the great leap in scientific knowledge that took place in the Islamic world between the 8th and 14th centuries.

    Its legacy is tangible, with terms like algebra, algorithm and alkali all being Arabic in origin and at the very heart of modern science – there would be no modern mathematics or physics without algebra, no computers without algorithms and no chemistry without alkalis.

    For Baghdad-born Al-Khalili this is also a personal journey and on his travels he uncovers a diverse and outward-looking culture, fascinated by learning and obsessed with science.

    From the great mathematician Al-Khwarizmi, who did much to establish the mathematical tradition we now know as algebra, to Ibn Sina, a pioneer of early medicine whose Canon of Medicine was still in use as recently as the 19th century, he pieces together a remarkable story of the often-overlooked achievements of the early medieval Islamic scientists.

    Running time 2 hours 56 min.

  • Search for Earthlike Planets

    For many years, the remarkable planet-searching mission, Kepler, gazed at a large body of 150,000 stars situated in a neighborhood located 3,000 light years away from planet Earth. The valuable information harvested by this space probe has brought a critical point in this lengthy search for earthlike planets. Is planet Earth one of many life-supporting worlds scattered across the galaxy; or is it a unique garden of Eden in a desolate universe?
     
    Running time 27 Minutes.
  • Space Station Tour

    Most of the modules in the International Space Station have four sides and they're put together that way so the people can work on a flat plane; wall, floor, another wall, or the ceiling. All you have to do is turn yourself around and your reference changes. People always ask about sleeping in space. Do you lie down? Not really, because it doesn't matter. You don't have the sensation of lying down, so you just sit in your sleeping bag.

    running time 25 min.
  • Super Hurricanes

    For millennia, we saw the oceans as mysterious wellsprings of nature's power, capable of rising up and engulfing us. The history books are filled with stories of cities and towns caught off guard by the sudden onrush of a tropical storm.

    We now see hurricanes, typhoons, and cyclones as the product of climate systems on a much larger scale... water and wind, oceans and land. They are fueled by heat from the sun, captured and stored in the upper layer of tropical oceans. The deeper and warmer this upper layer becomes, the stronger and longer lasting a hurricane can be.

     
    Running time 30 minutes.
  • The Moon, the Tides and Neil DeGrasse Tyson

    The Moon, the Tides and why Neil DeGrasse Tyson is Colbert's God is the actual title of this interview.

    Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson is the Director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City, host of the PBS series NOVA Science Now and co-host (with comedienne Lynne Koplitz) of the radio show Star Talk.

    He is the author of nine books including his memoir The Sky is Not the Limit: Adventures of an Urban Astrophysicist and his most recent, The Pluto Files: The Rise and Fall of America's Favorite Planet.

    This is a conversation on cosmology, physics, and the history and purpose of science among other topics.

    Running time 57 min.

  • Thorium Dream

    There's much to take for granted in the evolution of technology, or at least in the way that technology appears to us today – refined, perfected, ever cutting-edge.

    Globally, our energy and resource supplies are becoming increasingly costly to extract and use. Demand has never been higher; ditto levels of CO2 and other terrible greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

    Nuclear energy is powerful, but it can look worse, given persistent waste storage issues and the threat of proliferation.

    Running time 28 min.

  • Thorium: An Energy Solution

    Thorium is readily available and can be turned into energy without generating transuranic wastes. Thorium's capacity as nuclear fuel was discovered during WW II, but ignored because it was unsuitable for making bombs.

    A liquid-fluoride thorium reactor (LFTR) is the optimal approach for harvesting energy from Thorium, and has the potential to solve today's energy/climate crisis.

    Running time 120 min.

  • Through the Wormhole: Does Time Exist?

    When you're having fun, time flies. Waiting in a traffic jam, not so much. Your birthday was last month, and your mortgage payment is due in a few days. The fact that we perceive time is certainly no illusion. But is it really there, or is it something we invented?

    Early on in human history, we decided to start measuring the days and weeks, and eventually hours, minutes and seconds. Time was useful in organizing society, planting crops and getting ready for dates. Things worked extremely well until scientists started muddling it all up.

    In the 17th century, English scientist Isaac Newton was pretty sure time existed as a universal constant. But in 1908, Hermann Minkowski, expanding on one of Einstein's ideas on the relationship between space and time, suggested a space-time continuum. This theory held that space and time were inextricably mixed, with all events occurring along the same timeline. Einstein presented his theory of general relativity not long after this and proposed that time is but an illusion.

    Around the same time (if you believe in time, that is), the field of quantum mechanics grew out of an effort to explain the relationship between matter and energy. This presented a little problem for scientists trying to create a single, unified theory to account for the universe and its component parts. Quantum mechanics requires the existence of time to work. General relativity does not
    Running time 42 min.
  • Through the Wormhole: What Do Aliens Look Like?

    Science fiction writers have always had their little green men. But these humanoid aliens were based soundly on Earth-based life, not any extra terrestrial evidence.

    Today, we've discovered hundreds of planets around other stars. As we learn what some of these alternative Earths might look like, science and imagination have allowed us to use real science to imagine the biology of their inhabitants.

    Will they have two eyes? Two legs? What color will their skin be? Which species on Earth can give us clues about likely biology of aliens?

    And what can we learn from how life on Earth developed to help us understand what ET really looks like? List of all episodes here: Through The Wormhole.


    Running time 42 minutes.

  • Universe From Nothing

    Lawrence Krauss gives a talk on our current picture of the universe, how it will end, and how it could have come from nothing.

    Krauss is the author of many bestselling books on Physics and Cosmology, including "The Physics of Star Trek."

    If you’ve ever wanted to answer that annoying question, "how could the Universe have formed from nothing", then watch this video.

    Lawrence Krauss is funny, informative, and if you watch the entire video (it’s over an hour long, so you might need to pause it a few times), he will blow your mind. Lawrence seems like a pretty cool guy.

    Running time 52 min.

  • Violent Universe

    Take a breathtaking journey into the future, five billion years from now, to see the ultimate fate of the Solar System. This gem from HubbleCast showcases stunning Hubble imagery of the death throes of Sun-like stars. The wreckage of these dying stars form the building blocks of new generations of stars.

    The Galactic Center harbors the closest supermassive black hole known, and the one that is also the largest in terms of its angular diameter on the sky, making it the best choice for a detailed study of black holes.

    Full documentary 3 hours.

  • Visions of the Future

    In this new three-part documentary, leading theoretical physicist and futurist Dr Michio Kaku explores the cutting edge science of today, tomorrow, and beyond.

    He argues that humankind is at a turning point in history. In this century, we are going to make the historic transition from the ‘Age of Discovery’ to the ‘Age of Mastery’, a period in which we will move from being passive observers of nature to its active choreographers. This will give us not only unparalleled possibilities but also great responsibilities.

    1. The Intelligence Revolution. In the opening installment, Kaku explains how artificial intelligence will revolutionise homes, workplaces and lifestyles, and how virtual worlds will become so realistic that they will rival the physical world. Robots with human-level intelligence may finally become a reality, and in the ultimate stage of mastery, we’ll even be able to merge our minds with machine intelligence.

    For the first time on television, see how a severely depressed patient can be turned into a happy person at the push of a button – all thanks to the cross-pollination of neuroscience and artificial intelligence.

    2. The Biotech Revolution Genetics and biotechnology promise a future of unprecedented health and longevity: DNA screening could prevent many diseases, gene therapy could cure them and, thanks to lab-grown organs, the human body could be repaired as easily as a car, with spare parts readily available. Ultimately, the ageing process itself could be slowed down or even halted.

    But what impact will this have on who we are and how we will live? And, with our mastery of the genome, will the human race end up in a world divided by genetic apartheid?

    3. The Quantum Revolution The quantum revolution could turn many ideas of science fiction into science fact – from metamaterials with mind-boggling properties like invisibility through limitless quantum energy and room temperature superconductors to Arthur C Clarke’s space elevator. Some scientists even forecast that in the latter half of the century everybody will have a personal fabricator that re-arranges molecules to produce everything from almost anything.

    Running time 3- 1 hour segments.

  • Vsauce: Our World is Amazing

    This is not really a documentary but it's an incredible, 10-hours-long, video material full of amazing scientific explanations. Don't be discouraged by the length of the playlist because the material is divided in relatively small parts and you can digest them in your own time. This is simply a compilation of the most popular videos of one spectacular YouTube channel - Vsauce.

    Michael, the owner of the channel, has a unique talent of presenting scientific facts in a very interesting way. If you think you're familiar with the everyday science, then wait until you see what he has to say. Michael's explanations include a wide spectrum of scientific topics, such as:

    What will happen if everyone on Earth jumped at once? Does the mirror have a color? Why do people kiss? Do everyone see the same colors? What's the most fatal place on the planet? How high can our buildings go? Why are things scary? Why are bad words labeled as bad? Does the shadow have a weight? What would happen if the sun disappears? Does anyone own the moon? Can we live forever?

    Can you do anything without a brain? Will we ever go to the stars? Can a baby be born in space? How big can a person get? Why do we play video games? What is the most exceptional metal on Earth? Is anything really real? Where do deleted files on our computers go? Why are some things attractive? Why do we wear clothes at all? Why do we need dreams? Why do we have two nostrils when one is totally fine?

    Are we ready for the eventual alien appearance? How hot can it get on planet Earth? Why don't we taxidermy humans... like we do with the animals? How many photos have been taken so far in total? Why do we sometimes get bored? How much does the Internet actually weigh? Is yawning contagious?... and many, many more.

    Running time 600 minutes.

  • What is One Degree?

    Comedian Ben Miller returns to his roots as a physicist to try to answer a deceptively simple question: what is one degree of temperature?

    His quest takes him to the frontiers of current science as he meets researchers working on the hottest and coldest temperatures in the universe, and to a lab where he experiences some of the strangest effects of quantum physics - a place where super-cooled liquids simply pass through solid glass.

    running time 60 minutes.

  • What Is Reality?

    There is a strange and mysterious world that surrounds us, a world largely hidden from our senses.

    The quest to explain the true nature of reality is one of the great scientific detective stories.

    Clues have been pieced together from deep within the atom, from the event horizon of black holes, and from the far reaches of the cosmos.

    It may be that that we are part of a cosmic hologram, projected from the edge of the universe. Or that we exist in an infinity of parallel worlds. Your reality may never look quite the same again.

    Running time 59 minutes.

  • When We Left Earth: The NASA Missions

    Prepare for lift-off with this stunning, high-definition six-part series chronicling the inside story of NASA's most epic endeavors. Commemorating the space agency's 50th anniversary, follow John Glenn's Mercury mission to orbit the earth, Neil Armstrong's first historic steps on the moon, unprecedented spacewalks to repair the Hubble stories, and more!

    Celebrate mankind's greatest missions with stories that are literally out of this world, shown in stunning clarity and told by the astronauts and engineers who were there, including exclusive interviews with celebrated astronauts such as John Glenn, Buzz Aldrin and Charlie Duke, plus newly-digitized, original mission footage from NASA's secret film vaults.

    Ordinary Supermen - NASA selects seven men to become the first astronauts, all test pilots who are prepared to risk their lives. No one has ever survived a vertical launch on top of a rocket, but it's believed to be the only way to put an astronaut into earth orbit. NASA and America's first astronauts, the Mercury Seven, are on a journey into the unknown. Six of the men ride into space, each launch taking NASA further forward in their quest to conquer the cosmos.

    Friends and Rivals - Nine new astronauts arrive at NASA. Their mission? Test all of the procedures required to land men on the moon and bring them safely back to earth. Each Gemini mission launches two men into space, leading to some of NASA's greatest moments: Ed White's spacewalk, the first orbital rendezvous of Gemini 6 and 7, and Neil Armstrong's first space docking.

    Landing the Eagle - The Apollo program is set to achieve the ultimate prize of the Space Race, landing men on the moon. But a fire breaks out in the pressurized capsule of Apollo 1, resulting in the deaths of three beloved astronauts. However, NASA rebounds, launching men into deep space and landing Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon.

    The Explorers - Apollo 13 puts the astronauts to the ultimate test, returning a damaged spacecraft back safely to earth. Apollo 17 sends man for the longest mission yet to the surface of the moon, but it's the last lunar mission for generations. Now, it's time for a new phase in the program: converting an unused Saturn V rocket, NASA launches Skylab, America's first space-station.

    The Shuttle - For its first 20 years, NASA launches capsules carrying a maximum of three people. But new requirements for a bigger cargo bay prompt a breakthrough in spacecraft design. The development of the re-usable shuttle leads to a revolutionary approach to space travel. Meanwhile, the pioneers of NASA's manned programs are leading the way into the modern era of the space-age.

    A Home In Space - One of the most complex instruments ever built, the Hubble Space Telescope is expected to transform our understanding of the Universe. But once it is in orbit NASA discovers a serious problem, a defective main mirror. NASA sends a team of astronauts to fix the problem in its greatest and highest profile mission since the Apollo era. It gives NASA the confidence to begin construction on the International Space Station.

    Full documentary 5 Hours.

  • World of Nanoscience

    Where and what is nano? How will it shape our future? Nanoscience is the study of phenomena and manipulation of materials at the nanoscale, where properties differ significantly from those at a larger scale. The strange world of Nanoscience - it can take you into atoms and beyond the stars.

    The nanoscale ranges from 100 nanometres down to the atomic level, where a nanometre is a millionth part of a millimetre.

    Running time 18 min.